One Year Ago Today, July 7

One Year Ago Today, July 7

2016-07-07

Explanation: LORRI (LOng Range Reconnaissance Imager) image of Pluto and Charon, taken one year ago today on July 7, 2015.

Image credit: NASA/JHUAPL/SwRI

Give a dog a bone

Give a dog a bone

2016-07-06

Explanation: The deconvolution process in action, from left: Picture A is one of a set of four LORRI images of Pluto’s small moon Kerberos; in B, the four images have been combined to produce a 2x-finer finer pixel scale; C is the combined image corrected for blurring; and D has been interpolated to remove the blocky appearance and reveal new details about Pluto’s moon Kerberos.

Image credit: NASA/JHUAPL/SwRI

Hazard Hunting

Hazard Hunting

2016-07-05

Explanation: In these simulated images from New Horizons’ Long-Range Reconnaissance Imager (LORRI), I demonstrated an approach to the hazard search. The image on the left (prepared by New Horizons’ John Spencer) shows Pluto and Charon greatly over-exposed to capture faint moons hiding among the heavily crowded background of Milky Way stars. The image at right shows a model of the fixed stars subtracted to reveal the four known small satellites of Pluto. This approach worked extremely well for the actual search.

Image credit: NASA/JHUAPL/SwRI

Juno arrives!

Juno arrives!

2016-07-04

Explanation: NASA’s Juno spacecraft obtained this color view on June 21, 2016, at a distance of 6.8 million miles (10.9 million kilometers) from Jupiter. Today, July 4, 2016, Juno arrives at Jupiter! Learn about the mission at www.nasa.gov/juno!

Image credit: NASA/JPL-Caltech/SwRI/MSSS

Rewriting the Playbook on Pluto

Rewriting the Playbook on Pluto

2016-07-02

Explanation: Richard Binzel (left) and New Horizons Principal Investigator Alan Stern with the 1997 book “Pluto and Charon,” which the mission team used more than any other text to form New Horizons’ science objectives. Plans are in the works for a sequel, tentatively titled “Pluto after New Horizons,” that would set the stage for the next generation of Pluto explorers.

Image credit: SwRI/Cindy Conrad

One Year Ago Today, July 1

One Year Ago Today, July 1

2016-07-01

Explanation: LORRI (LOng Range Reconnaissance Imager) image of Pluto and Charon, taken one year ago today on July 1, 2015.

Image credit: NASA/JHUAPL/SwRI

Hubble clears things up

Hubble clears things up

2016-06-30

Explanation: One of the first images returned from Hubble of a single New Horizons Kuiper Belt object search field.

Image credit: STScI/NASA/SwRI

The search beyond Pluto

The search beyond Pluto

2016-06-29

Explanation: A small subsection of a single Magellan survey image, showing the dense star fields searched for Kuiper Belt objects.

Image credit: Alex Parker

A model for 1994 JR1

A model for 1994 JR1

2016-06-28

Explanation: Saturn’s moon Phoebe may be similar to JR1.

Image credit: NASA/JPL-Caltech/SSI

A phase curve 1994 JR1

A phase curve 1994 JR1

2016-06-27

Explanation: The brightness of JR1 from Earth (red and green) and New Horizons (blue). The blue points can only be gathered by spacecraft.

Image credit: Porter et al, 2015, under review