Imagine a Landing on Pluto

Imagine a Landing on Pluto

2016-07-17

Explanation: Made from more than 100 New Horizons images taken over six weeks of approach and close flyby, this video offers a trip to Pluto — starting with a distant spacecraft’s-eye view of Pluto and its largest moon, Charon, to an eventual ride in for a “landing” on the shoreline of Pluto’s informally named Sputnik Planum. The video shows what it would be like to ride aboard an approaching spacecraft and see Pluto grow from a “dot” to become a world, and then to swoop down over Pluto’s spectacular terrains. Pluto picture of the day is coming to an end, but New Horizons is not finished. Visit pluto.jhuapl.edu and nasa.gov/newhorizons for more information on the mission!

 

Image credit: NASA/Johns Hopkins University Applied Physics Laboratory/Southwest Research Institute

 

Where is New Horizons now? (July 2016)

Where is New Horizons now? (July 2016)

2016-07-16

Explanation: Pluto picture of the day may be winding down, but New Horizons still travels on. One year after the Pluto flyby, this image shows New Horizons’ current position along its full planned trajectory. The green segment of the line shows where New Horizons has traveled since launch; the red indicates the spacecraft’s future path. Positions of stars with magnitude 12 or brighter are shown from this perspective, which is slightly above the orbital plane of the planets. New Horizons will reach 2014 MU69 on January 1, 2019

Image credit: NASA/JHUAPL/SwRI

One Year Ago Today– July 15, 2016

One Year Ago Today– July 15, 2016

2016-07-15

Explanation: LORRI (LOng Range Reconnaissance Imager) image of Pluto and Charon, taken one year ago today on July 16, 2015.

Image credit: NASA/JHUAPL/SwRI

Happy anniversary, New Horizons!

Happy anniversary, New Horizons!

2016-07-14

Explanation: One year ago today, New Horizons flew by Pluto, Charon, Styx, Nix, Kerberos and Hydra.

Image credit: NASA/JHUAPL/SwRI

One Year Ago Today, July 13

One Year Ago Today, July 13

2016-07-13

Explanation: LORRI (LOng Range Reconnaissance Imager) image of Pluto and Charon, taken one year ago today on July 13, 2015. This is the last LORRI image with Pluto and Charon in the same frame returned before encounter.

Image credit: NASA/JHUAPL/SwRI

Clearing up Pluto

Clearing up Pluto

2016-07-12

Explanation: At left, a LORRI image of Pluto taken July 12, 2015, two days before closest approach. The image at right and others taken at the same time were combined as single image with a 2x-finer pixel scale and corrected for blurring to reveal many more details.

Image credit: NASA/JHUAPL/SwRI

15 minutes before

15 minutes before

2016-07-11

Explanation: This image of Pluto was taken roughly 15 minutes before closest approach by New Horizons’ LOng Range Reconnaissance Imager. You can find images from the encounter at pluto.jhuapl.edu.

Image credit: NASA/JHUAPL/SwRI

One Year Ago Today, July 10

One Year Ago Today, July 10

2016-07-10

Explanation: LORRI (LOng Range Reconnaissance Imager) image of Pluto and Charon, taken one year ago today on July 10, 2015. This is the last LORRI image with Pluto and Charon in the same frame returned before encounter.

Image credit: NASA/JHUAPL/SwRI

One Year Ago Today, July 9

One Year Ago Today, July 9

2016-07-09

Explanation: LORRI (LOng Range Reconnaissance Imager) image of Pluto and Charon, taken one year ago today on July 9, 2015.

Image credit: NASA/JHUAPL/SwRI

Be gone, scattered light!

Be gone, scattered light!

2016-07-08

Explanation: At left is one of more than 200 LORRI images obtained to image the dark side of Charon by “Plutoshine;” the bright striations are sunlight scattered into the camera. At right, after all of the images are combined and corrected for the scattered light — Charon’s crescent and nightside are revealed!

Image credit: NASA/JHUAPL/SwRI